AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Telemedicine, Bringing Improved Medical Care to India’s Rural Poor

In the United States, much has been said about how Telemedicine technologies are offering improved access and medical care to rural locations, particularly access to specialized medical care providers. But in many countries such as India, the opportunity to advance medical care to rural areas has a much more profound meaning to those in need of health care services.

India is administratively organized into state towns, district towns, block marketplaces, and then villages and healthcare, as such, is distributed along that supply chain with each level of infrastructure offering a lower standard of care.  Even in some of the fastest growing regions of India, as many as 85 percent of the 100 million residents only have access to healthcare that is at the bottom of the quality spectrum.  Private, better quality medical services may be located hundreds of miles away and take hours or days to reach by rural patients and are only available for those who have the money to pay.

Enter World Health Partners (WHP), an international nonprofit organization that provides health and reproductive health services in low-income countries by harnessing local market forces to work for the poor. Leveraging existing social and economic infrastructure, WHP utilizes the latest advances in communication, diagnostic and medical technology to build an ecosystem atop the existing private sector to bring improved medical services to even the most rural areas of India.

WHP is teaming up with out of the way, unlicensed, village health practitioners, or Quacks as they are known in India, to connect poor, rural patients with doctors located in Patna and Delhi.  For an investment of about $1000.00, each of the more than 433 quacks currently in WHP’s network of telemedicine practitioners can set up a Wifi network, laptop computer and the necessary equipment to make it all work, or at least work most of the time.  The system is not perfect and experiences frequent break downs but it saves time, money, and in some cases can save lives, for rural families that would otherwise have to travel hours to larger cities.

World Health Partners is working towards setting up 16,000, mostly privately owned and operated, telemedicine centers throughout India’s most rural provinces in hopes of bringing the convenience and benefits of telemedicine to the poorest of India’s population.  In addition, the concept is being scaled to be exported to countries and regions well beyond India, with hopes of reaching millions of world’s neediest populations.



Think of Your Brain!

It is without a doubt the most vital organ in the human body, but too often we neglect the importance of taking good care of our brain. The development and organization of the brain are incredibly complex, but the intricacies of this central body belie the simplicity of its proper day to day caretaking. We only get one – why not give some thought (pun intended) to it.

Prevention of traumatic head injuries is likely the most obvious consideration for avoiding significant damage to the brain. Unfortunately, we cannot always predict when an accident might occur, but we can take basic steps like fastening our seat belts while riding in automobiles and wearing helmets when engaging in physical activities carrying risk of trauma. Beneath the skull, we must be concerned with degenerative disorders of the brain affecting motor skills and cognition, such as Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s. Depression and anxiety also afflict millions of individuals across the country. It is important to remember that although our fast paced, high-stress lives can seem overwhelming, these conditions are chemical, and there are measures we can take to mitigate their negative effects.

Perhaps the most severe threat to the brain is stroke and other cardiovascular disease. The American lifestyle has taken a significant toll on the health of the blood vessels that deliver vital oxygen and nutrients to the brain. We have seen it most exaggerated throughout the southeastern US, a part of the country known as the ‘Stroke Belt,’ where residents face significantly higher rates of stroke morbidity and mortality.

The experts offering advice to citizens on how to minimize their risk of stroke sound like a veritable broken record; sleep more. Eat better. Exercise. Although stroke care has made huge advances in technology and technique over the course of the past decade, there is truthfully no more powerful plan of action than that of prevention. Telemedicine may soon be able to play a bigger role in opening lines communications between physicians and patients at risk of having a stroke, helping them take the necessary steps to avoid an emergency situation where the health of their brain and their life are in danger. As neurologists become more familiar with the advantages of new telemedicine technologies, they are realizing that the “ounce of prevention” is more readily available than ever before.