AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Study Reveals Application of Telemedicine Delivers Positive Outcomes

A recent study by The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) entitled Telehealth: Mapping the Evidence for Patient Outcomes from Systematic Reviews, indicates that that the application of telehealth delivers the most positive outcomes when used for remote patient monitoring, the treatment of several chronic health conditions and for psychotherapy as part of overall behavioral health. The leading chronic conditions, for telehealth success was cardiovascular and respiratory disease, according to the AHRQ study. The study’s authors also said that “research into practice-level implementation should be the next step, particularly since the vast majority of research conducted to date has been conducted within old and possibly soon-to-be-outdated care delivery models.”

The purpose of the study was to provide an overview of the large body of data about telehealth for use by healthcare decision makers. The approach used was to create an evidence map of systematic reviews published to date that assess the impact of telehealth on clinical outcomes. According to the report, the focus of future systematic reviews could include telehealth for consultation, uses in intensive care units and applications in maternal and child health. In addition, telemedicine for triage in urgent or primary care, management of serious pediatric conditions, patient outcomes for TeleDermatology, and the integration of behavioral and physical health were earmarked by AHRQ as ripe for analysis.

Healthcare remains a system where service is delivered primarily through in-person interactions, but many hospitals, physician groups and clinics as well as tech-savvy patient/consumers are turning to telemedicine to effectively and efficiently deliver and receive healthcare services regardless of their geographical location. The rise of utilization of telemedicine is one of the largest and most disruptive shifts in healthcare delivery over the last decade. With recent advances in telemedicine technology, an impending evolution in legislation governing the use of telehealth and falling regulatory barriers predicate that 2016 may be a turning point for the increased adoption of telemedical technology in the delivery of healthcare across a full spectrum of healthcare disciplines.



Telemedicine Achieves Its Potential for Parkinson’s Patients

Ask any patient suffering from chronic disease and they often will tell a story of isolation, uncertainty and frustration over the debilitating effects of their disease. Many times the focus of their complaints is not being afforded easy access to specialized care and consultation with caregivers. While significant inroads have been made in the treatment options for chronic maladies like Diabetes and Parkinson’s disease, gaining routine, daily access to those ground breaking discoveries is out of the reach of many sufferers.

Researchers are looking at how modern communication technology, coupled with the latest techniques in treating Parkinson disease, can revolutionize the quality of care for sufferers of the chronic neurological disorder. “We are looking at quality of life, quality of care and reducing the burden on healthcare providers”, says Dr. Ray Dorsey, co-director of the Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics at the University of Rochester (N.Y.) Medical Center. “Imagine if you thought there was a possibility you had Parkinson’s disease, but you lived 100 miles or more from the nearest medical center with a qualified neurologist. You’re faced with at least a couple of hours of driving, of navigating an unfamiliar urban environment, of parking and walking—and that’s assuming you’re able to find a neurologist within driving distance to begin with. Now think about how easy it is to buy a book or a pair of shoes online. The two should not be so different.”

Preliminary results of the Connect.Parkinson project, the nation’s first randomized clinical trial of remote treatment of Parkinson’s disease, indicate the benefits of virtual treatment for patients and caregivers alike. A recent report on the initial results of the 18-state, Connect.Parkinson project reported that 95 percent of Parkinson’s patients completing telehealth visits have experienced an increased proportion of the time with a healthcare professional of 89 percent; up from 25 percent for those opting for traditional in-person encounters.

The National Parkinson Foundation is committed to supporting efforts to demonstrate how telemedicine can enhance the delivery of care to people with Parkinson’s. Studies are indicating that telemedicine care, often delivered in the patients home, is just as good as care received at a brick and motor medical center. The fact that diagnosing and monitoring the progression of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders is based almost entirely on visual observation makes Parkinson uniquely suited for virtual care technologies. Christopher Goetz, MD, a leading expert on movement disorders and director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center at Rush University Medical Center says, “Ninety-five percent of the information I gather is visual. Thus, with telemedicine visits where I can see and hear my patient right in front of me on the computer screen, there is no decline in the quality of information I gather.”

Rush is located in the state of Illinois which is among those states not yet mandating payers to provide payments for telemedical services. But according to Dr. Brian Patty, Rush’s chief medical information office and chairman of Rush’s Telemedicine Steering Committee, the Medical Center has several telemedicine pilot projects underway that can likely have significant impact on Parkinson patients.

In New York, researchers at The Rochester Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics, are developing and testing mobile apps that will help Parkinson’s patients track metrics such as dexterity, balance, gait, voice patterns and cognition, then send readings to researchers.

After decades of promises, telemedicine is delivering on its promise to increase access to quality, specialty care to improve patient outcomes.