AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


A Shifting Attitude

Telemedicine’s role in the current healthcare environment has been blossoming over the course of the past few years, making progress towards the full realization of the field’s potential.  A certain percentage of healthcare professionals are already there; those who have seen telemedicine at work day in and day out already know that we are providing patients with excellent care, mitigating costs to the healthcare system, and saving lives. The challenge remains getting the rest of our industry and our patients up to speed.

Improving care standards and lowering health care costs are their own rewards, but also important is the evident change in the way people think about getting medical treatment. Telemedicine is significantly changing patient behavior. We have heard astonishing figures – flirting with near 100% satisfaction rates – when it comes to positive experiences for both hospital workers and patients.

Presumably, an estimated 20% of the roughly 140 million ER visits that hospitals bear each year are able to be treated virtually. That number jumps to around 70% when considering urgent care centers and primary care physicians. The aforementioned shift in attitude about how to best access care in emergencies and non-emergencies is crucial to opening the door for telemedicine to alleviate much of the burdens these unnecessary visits place on the system. Reducing the stress on physical and financial resources also means better care across the board when patients do come to the hospital.

The speed, efficiency, and improved coordination of care are all great assets for a society battling with the challenges of an inefficient traditional healthcare system. The good news is that the many advantages of telemedicine for payers, providers, and patients are truly beginning to take root with the public, and driving behavior that will lead to even better results down the road.



Opening the Dialogue to Better Care

Amidst much confusion and debate about plotting the best course towards achieving the so-called ‘triple-aim’ of increasing quality, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing costs, the healthcare community is struggling with communications amongst payers, vendors, and providers. Creating initiatives that encourage the development of more efficient, more sustainable healthcare requires the participation of all these entities in an ongoing conversation.

For physicians, making the ecosystem more intelligent is not exactly a simple proposition. Focused on delivering care, doctors typically do not have affinities for nor access to the kinds of information readily available to payers and vendors, such as performance metrics, analytics, and risk management considerations. Fostering an environment in which this data and knowledge can be openly shared is a pivotal step in helping doctors operate smarter.

As eHealth and the growth of telemedicine begin to significantly impact the delivery of care, the healthcare industry must address questions as to how physicians can better access these insights and be stimulated to embrace best practices, as well as how plan members can be similarly empowered to make better decisions. The answers come in the form of more open dialogue. Each party needs to share a similar, if not identical perspective on what constitutes quality to effectively collaborate.

With an ever-expanding arsenal of tools and knowledge at their disposal, physicians must call upon available resources in the form of industry partners to take advantage of this opportunity. The result will be a more intelligent system that benefits the entire network.