AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Knowledge: Can Too Much Be Just As Dangerous As Too Little

What does the “world’s first evidence-based mobile resilience program”, a 21-day personalized program to help wearers manage their stress and build mental resilience, and the “Shimmer3”, a slim-line sensor that can be strapped to an athlete’s arm in training to provide coaches with biophysical data, have in common? These are just two of the many hundreds new wearable electronic monitoring devices entering the crowded medical application market. Wearable monitoring devices are not new as healthcare providers have been utilizing devices to collect data on patients suffering from chronic diseases such as cardiac disease and diabetes.

To spur innovation, last year Qualcomm Life, a subsidiary of the chip maker Qualcomm and a big sponsor of wireless healthcare technology, announced a $10m prize for a Star Trek-style “tricorder” to be awarded to the first developer to succeed in designing a mobile platform capable of diagnosing a set of 15 conditions, including pneumonia, diabetes and sleep apnea, without recourse to a doctor or nurse. Don Jones, vice-president of Qualcomm Life, says, “Think of every way you have ever interacted with a medical professional or someone in a clinical setting – a doctor, a nurse, or your corner pharmacist – then think how that can be replicated digitally so that the process is both more convenient and faster,” he says. “The odds are that someone in Silicon Valley is already working on it.”

You can find high-tech wearable gadgets around the wrist, ankles and chests of just about every tech savvy enthusiast, leading some to champion their appearance as a means of keeping us all more in tune with our own health. Others are expressing cautious concern on how data is being interpreted by the less medically trained among us. What do we lose when healthcare becomes nothing more than a stream of digitalized physiological outputs, parsed and quantified by algorithms without the interpretation of experienced medical providers? The rise of digital medicine will have significant impact on the health and welfare of patients with the manner in which it is utilized determining whether this will be for better or for worse.

“Advancements in telemedicine allow us to provide acute stroke care quickly and efficiently, in situations where seconds matter,” comments Dr. James Kiely, partner, AcuteCare Telemedicine. “As technology reaches another inflection point with consumers, it’s important to educate users that data is more valuable in the hands of a board-certified medical practitioner.”



AcuteCare Telemedicine and Ty Cobb Regional Medical Center Team Up to Improve Access to Immediate Stroke Care

Throughout Georgia and all around the country, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) responders are charged with reacting to emergency calls for assistance, providing emergency evaluation and treatment of a vast array of injuries and illnesses and delivery victims to emergency rooms for more advanced treatment.

The work requires split-second decisions that may affect the patient’s recovery.  Often the decision to bypass the nearest, more rural hospital for an urban medical center, known for its specialized treatment for such illnesses as stroke, can delay the patient’s arrival to that facility beyond the “golden hour”, the first sixty minutes after a patient begins to experience stroke symptoms and the critical window for providing care that can minimize long-term disabilities or prevent a stroke death.

At a recent conference at Ty Cobb Regional Medical Center (TCRMC) in Lavonia, GA, area EMS responders learned of a new program at the hospital that offers advanced critical, specialized care for victims of stroke. The goal was to educate emergency responders about its new telestroke program and how it can benefit the community, and TCRMC by capturing potential stroke patients that may have been otherwise bypassed by EMS personnel in the past.

The new teleneurology/telestroke program is a relationship between TCRMC and AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), a leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking advanced around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care.  Presenting the conference was Dr. David Stone, TCRMC Emergency Room Director and ACT’s CIO Dr. James M. Kiely, who is also partner at Atlanta Neurology, P.C. and Medical Director of the Neurophysiology Departments at Northside Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta.

Members of the Franklin County and Hart County EMS were on hand to receive information about the new service line and EMS’ role in triaging potential stroke patients.  “The goal of this new relationship with TCRMC is to build awareness in the area about ACT’s 24/7 stroke treatment coverage and to advance the area residence understanding of stroke, its symptoms and the importance of receiving immediate specialized treatment, said Dr. Kiely.”

Attending EMS personnel received information regarding strokes “golden hour”, and when it is appropriate to take patients directly to TY Cobb Regional Medical Center or when it is better indicated to take patients directly to an advanced tertiary treatment center.

Recent studies indicate that telestroke programs, like the one provided by AcuteCare Telemedicine, may improve access to immediate stroke care by 40 percent and bring advanced care within reach of millions of stroke victims now located outside the hour of critical care for the fourth most common cause of death in the United States.



Beam Me Up, Doc!

Telemedicine, the rapidly developing application of clinical medical services utilizing today’s advanced communication technology, is moving forward at an escalating pace. Challenges to its wide spread implementation are being overcome with advancements and refinements to the technology. As physicians and patients concerns over the effectiveness of care and information security are addressed, the promises of lower cost, more accessible, quality, health care conducted via the internet is gaining popularity among healthcare providers and patients alike.

With the concept of telemedicine now having been successfully established, AcuteCare Telemedicine is utilizing the modern communication technology to enable personal neurology consultation when doctor and patient are in different locations. ACT makes urgent stroke care accessible for more patients and cost-effective for hospitals and clinicians. Expanding clinical services where physicians electronically treat patients directly without a clinician being present with the patient is the most logical next step in the technology’s progression.

Patients and physicians in Hawaii are now able to enroll in Hawaii Medical Service Association (HMSA) Online Care program where patients receive care from participating doctors who are scheduled to be reachable at that moment. HMSA says thousands of patients have registered, and in New York, about 10,000 individuals, most of them residents of the New York metropolitan area, can already get an online emergency consultation with emergency room physicians.

Jay Sanders, president emeritus of the American Telemedicine Association says, “Probably the most powerful aspect of telemedicine is improving access and improving the convenience of a lot of elements of healthcare, so, whether you’re talking about folks who would have a hard time getting to a specialist or whether you’re talking about someone who is in a jam and needs to see a doctor before they go on a business trip, telemedicine clinics are very valuable. These technologies are unlikely to replace office or hospital visits entirely”, says Sanders. “But they are tools physicians can add to an evolving ‘electronic black bag,’ as he calls it—the updated equivalent of the battered leather case brought along on house calls in a bygone age.



Long Distance Learning

Along with other massive changes brought on by the increasing power and reach of the internet, the past decade has seen a drastic increase in the number of undergraduate and graduate degrees attained online. Today, more than 12,000 different “digital degrees” can be obtained from accredited U.S. universities, a figure that has grown by double digits annually for the last five years.

While the growth of the internet has enabled a plethora of such ‘distance learning’ opportunities for collegiate education, new technologies and practices in telemedicine are simultaneously reinventing the approach to professional education in hospitals and healthcare facilities around the world.

The educational aspects of telehealth programs demand the least effort and level of investment of any implementation of the discipline, but the benefits of adoption are immense, and can serve as the building blocks for increased engagement down the road.

Telemedicine actually allows hospitals to bring the education directly into the facility, offering professional training directly from the experts on the newest procedures and protocols, as well as serving as a 24/7 resource always available for consultation.  Bringing this type of program into a hospital not only helps administrators, physicians, nurses, and staff better perform their jobs and offer patients a better standard of care, but also creates champions of the telemedicine services, opening the door to a healthcare ecosystem that is far more responsive to innovation.

Introducing telemedicine to healthcare facilities through educational initiatives is also a great way to align the goals of the hospital and the provider to foster stronger relationships for the future. The facility wants to offer top quality care within the confines of a tightening budget, and the provider wants to help its client hospital save lives while reducing spending in the process to demonstrate its competitive advantage. The educational process is a great way to interface with the effective and efficient solutions that telehealth can offer. It is a major step towards a future where all hospitals have access to the resources they need to operate equally efficiently; a win for patient and provider alike.