AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Mobile Healthcare and Monitoring on the Brink of Revolution

Wireless in-home health monitoring is expected to increase six-fold in the next four years. A recent study by InMedica indicates that 308,000 patients were remotely monitored by their healthcare provider for congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, hypertension, and mental health conditions worldwide in 2012. While congestive heart failure accounts for the majority of remote monitoring, it is expected that diabetes will supplant COPD with the second largest share of telehealth patients by 2017.  It is predicted that more than 1.8 million people worldwide will utilize mobile monitoring in the next four years.

Telemedicine is seen as a significant tool among healthcare providers for reducing hospital readmission rates, track patients chronic disease progression or provide advanced specialized medical treatment to patients in remote areas.  Four main factors are driving the demand for increased use of telemedicine and telehealth; Federal Readmission penalties introduced by the U.S. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS);  healthcare providers desires to increase ties to patients and improve quality of care; insurance providers who are looking to increase their competitiveness and reduce in-patient pay-outs by working directly with telehealth suppliers to monitor their patient base; and an anticipation for future increased demand for telehealth services by patients.

Of the billions of dollars spent on health care each year, 75% to 80% of it goes for patients with chronic illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, asthma and Alzheimer’s disease.  With rising costs and the anticipated shortage of physicians and healthcare providers over the next decade, utilizing the telemedicine technologies is becoming increasingly important to the routine delivery of medical services and monitoring of chronic diseases.

Even telepsychiatry, the use of secure Web-based video conferencing technology, and ambulatory patients, those who have been diagnosed with a disease at an ambulatory care facility but have not been hospitalized are expected to experience significant increased utilization of telemedicine among healthcare professionals in the next four years.  A plethora of emerging mobile technology, such as wearable wireless monitors to smartphone attachments will offer consumers the ability to track everything from core vital signs to impending heart attacks by discovering problems with heart tissue are on the horizon, offering a revolution in digital medical technology.

Speaking to those resisting the new mobile technology, Dr. Eric Topol, a professor of genomics at the Scripps Research Institute, recently encouraged the medical community to end paternal medicine, where only the physician has access to healthcare information, and to embark on a new beginning where patients own their data.  Dr. Topol compared the new mobile technology to the Gutenberg press and the way it revolutionized the way information was shared throughout the world.

We are embarking into a new era where patients have the mobile tools to better enable them to participate in their own medical diagnoses and treatment.



ACT Partner Taylor Regional Hospital Embraces Technology for Better Care Standard

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) partner Taylor Regional Hospital in Hawkinsville, GA is on the cutting edge of revolutionizing healthcare in underserved areas in rural parts of the Southeastern US.

Lacking the fiscal and logistical resources to implement the comprehensive services found at larger facilities in urban centers, Taylor Regional has openly embraced a wealth of new technologies to drastically improve the quality of care it offers patients within its surrounding communities.

Choosing ACT’s 24/7 teleneurology services was an elegant solution to a major deficiency facing the hospital. Taylor Regional has no neurologists on staff, and the nearest available specialists are located more than an hour away. Prior to the partnership with ACT, the hospital lacked the capability to effectively diagnose and treat stroke-causing clots, often having to transfer patients to a larger hospital, compromising crucial ‘door-to-needle’ time and reducing potential hospital revenues.

Through the adoption of beneficial programs such as the telemedicine services offered by ACT, the hospital has not only taken strides forward in treating patients internally, but has also enhanced communications with other facilities, connecting with other physicians for consultation and collaboration as well as streamlining transfer processes to ensure patients receive timely and expert care.

Most recently, the teleneurology services provided by ACT resulted in the administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in two separate cases of acute stroke at the facility in the month of August 2012. The two successful administrations of the clot-busting agent are a significant achievement, serving as a milestone for a teleneurology partnership that has now successfully extended this potentially-life saving service to residents of the counties surrounding Taylor Regional.

“We are very pleased with our partnership with ACT. The neurologists are extremely professional and eager for our telemedicine program to make a real difference in the care we are able to extend to our stroke patients,” commented Lynn Grant, Emergency Room and ICU Nurse Manager, Taylor Regional. “ACT is available 24/7, taking the time not just to be there for the patients, but for our physicians, nurses, and staff, answering questions and educating about the technology and techniques that are helping us save lives. Having this service is very rewarding.”

“Taylor Regional Hospital is on the cutting edge of emergency stroke care in rural Georgia. ACT has been particularly impressed with their clinical judgment, leadership and organization,” said Dr. James Kiely, Partner, ACT. “Their community is well served.”

For more information about ACT, visit www.acutecaretelemed.com.



Big Med Goes Back To School

In his most recent article in The New Yorker, contributor Dr. Atul Gawande demonstrates the value of quality-focused innovation in providing excellent service. Dr. Gawande nods to the Cheesecake Factory’s success in nimbly updating its large and varied menu as a potential model for healthcare innovation. Initially, he takes Big Med (as he calls organized American medicine) to task because, in his words, “good ideas still take an appallingly long time to trickle down,” but in the latter half of the article he provides examples of how the industry is getting things right.

Gawande’s own mother’s knee replacement surgery serves as his first example; by utilizing standardized protocols and equipment, his mother and her hospital achieved top results at a low cost. He then points to an innovative new way of managing patient data in real time that is serving to improve care: In Tele-ICU, nurses and doctors collect patient care data remotely from ICU patients and give direct feedback to the caregivers at the bedside. Using standardized treatment plans, Tele-ICU actually improves the quality of care while simultaneously lowering the costs associated with the sickest and traditionally most costly patients in the hospital.

As providers of teleneurology services, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) wholeheartedly agrees with Dr. Gawande’s observations. Improving the quality of care in emergency neurology requires a standardized, quality-driven approach. Simply put, something done frequently becomes something done well. Traditionally, most neurologists who take ER calls don’t get much experience treating acute stroke patients, and neurology training focuses on diagnosing the problem rather than emphasizing treatment options and paradigms. The nuances of tPA inclusion and exclusion and the decisions about other stroke treatment options mandate that the neurologist treating stroke emergencies be familiar with the most up-to-date practices. Who would you rather have piloting your medical care: the team that flies sporadically, or the one that flies every day?