AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


States are Leading the Way on Telemedicine Expansion

The states of Missouri and Kentucky are the two most recent states that are making significant strides in increased implementation and utilization of telemedicine.  Effective Jan. 1, 2014, a Missouri law (House Bill 986) makes private insurers responsible for reimbursing providers offering telehealth services just as these payers are for in-person services.  The bill states that insurers “shall not deny coverage for a health care service on the basis that the health care service is provided through telehealth if the same service would be covered if provided through face-to-face diagnosis, consultation, or treatment.”  While the new legislation benefits patients with private insurance payers, Missouri law still lacks provision for Medicaid beneficiaries.

In Kentucky, where state laws are in place for private and public payers, the legislators have expanded coverage of telemedicine services for Medicaid beneficiaries so long as these are delivered exclusively by way of interactive video-conferencing. The telehealth services covered by the law are extensive, ranging from mental health evaluations and care management to diabetes and physical therapy consultations.

These most recent events are indicative of individual state legislatures making the most aggressive progress towards removing regulations and passing legislation to accommodate the new technology’s use, while the federal government continues to focus on achieving a last place finish in the race for expansion.

American Telemedicine Association (ATA) CEO Jonathan Linkous said in a public statement recently. “The federal government places unnecessarily strict barriers and restraints on how Medicare patients are served when they deserve access to quality healthcare, regardless of geographic location and technology used.”

Kentucky and Missouri are joining a growing list of states that are realizing the benefit of telemedicine as a cost-effective delivery model for quality healthcare even though the two states have taken different approaches to expand access to telemedicine services. “This is a true win-win scenario,” said Jonathan Linkous, “First, it is a big victory for patients in Kentucky and Missouri, who now have greater access to the best-possible healthcare. It’s also a win for the treasury and taxpayers in those states, who will save significantly on public healthcare costs.”

With healthcare costs rising rapidly and access to specialized care diminishing for many Americans, it is well past a reasonable period of time for the top payer of medical services, the federal healthcare agencies and the U.S. Congress, to pick up the pace on making advances in passing and implementing legislation that will promote the advancement of telemedicine throughout the entire country.



Building Better Policy

Over the past several years, studies such as those conducted by the CDC and the National Institute of Health have constantly shown great disparity in levels of healthcare access across America. Particularly for poorer and rural areas, a lack of proper access has historically been extremely costly both in terms of human life and a greater economic impact. Policy makers, government officials, and leaders of health care organizations have recognized this divide, and are focused on identifying and eliminating barriers to patient access to provide a better, more uniform standard of effective healthcare across the country.

Thanks largely to leaps in technology and growing infrastructure, telemedicine is emerging as a highly effective solution with the potential to shape the future landscape of healthcare in America. The innovative, modern solutions offered by the growing telemedicine field combat the logistical challenges of the current state of healthcare, while having been proven to be more cost effective. Now, legislators are finally beginning to see the light.

On a state level, governments that have passed new telehealth legislation have seen positive results across the board. Powerful new applications and techniques have helped simplify and streamline remote patient consultation and monitoring, delivering better care with less economic impact with patient satisfaction rates nearing 100%. A dozen states, including Georgia, are leading the way on acknowledging telemedicine as an effective and efficient solution. So far in 2012, Maryland and Vermont have become the latest states to require private insurance companies to pay for telemedicine services.

The adoption of telemedicine marks a revolution in healthcare that carries great possibility for lasting impact. Creating a legislative environment in which telemedicine can flourish must continue to become a priority in a nation interested in reducing costs and saving lives.