AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Stepping up and Getting Out in Front of the Revolution

Historically the healthcare industry has been notoriously slow to adopt innovation but one health insurance company is stepping out in front of their industry when it comes to demonstrating a willingness to pay for telemedicine services, recognizing the potential for cost savings and simplification of services.

At this year’s Connected Health Symposium in Boston, John Jesser, VP of Provider Engagement Services for WellPoint, explained that his company is partnering with American Well Systems, a telemedicine services vendor, to set up the program for its members. Before the program was set up, patients who needed to see a physician during off-hours had limited options: Visit the ER and spend about $600; see a physician in an urgent care center for about $150; or wait until the doctor is back in the office. WellPoint introduced a new choice for its members, which only costs about $49.

Patients are able to use a laptop computer, mobile device or tablet to connect with a primary care physician.  The encounter takes about 10 minutes to initiate, is HIPAA compliant and the service can be paid for with a credit card.  Medical history is available to the attending physician.  In addition to WellPoint, a number of other insurers including; Aetna, Highmark and Cigna are experimenting with similar programs for their member policy holders.  Following South Carolina’s State legislators recent introduction of SB 290 and HB 3779, requiring private insurers to cover telemedicine services, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina and Blue Choice HealthPlan of South Carolina announced that they would start paying for some telemedicine services.

But a recent tally from the American Telemedicine Association indicates that nationwide coverage will be a slow journey.  As of October 2013, there were only 20 states, and the District of Columbia, that required insurance companies to pay for some form of telemedicine services: Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Vermont, and Virginia.

Insurers and state lawmakers aren’t the only ones with reservations about telemedicine. Ron Dixon, MD, the Director of the Virtual Practice at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), says, “I’ve found trying to get telehealth moving at MGH has been impeded by the way insurers pay for things. It’s been a big barrier to get it rolled into the way physicians actually practice.” He also believes that doctors resist offering telemedicine care because they simply have too much to do. “If you are going to get doctors involved, there has to be a win for them, and the win is usually time. It’s not always about the money.”

Massachusetts General Hospital has built a tool that allows existing patients to get their follow-up care online. The hospital pays providers for the service, and while the fees they receive are less than what they get for in-person visits, it also takes them less time to see a patient online, so it tends to balance out.

If the full benefits of telemedicine services are to realized, more insurers and practitioners will need to step up and overcome their reluctance to technologies that promise to revolutionize the traditional healthcare delivery model.



Extreme Telemedicine and the Urgency of Now

January and the New Year bring the Consumer Electronics Show, an exposition of tremendous scale where the newest and flashiest concepts and prototypes for technological marvel are put on display for the public. Innovation in medicine was a hot-button topic at this year’s show, as more and more attention has been focused on the state of the US healthcare system.

There is a new television commercial from a leading innovator in communications technology making its rounds. A segment of the ad shows a group of climbers on a snow covered mountain communicating with a doctor on a tablet computer. The doctor is explaining how to set the apparently broken leg of one of the members of the crew. This 5 second scene, interspersed with other vignettes displaying the company’s visions for the future of its technologies, is an intriguing and exciting flash forward into the vast potential that telemedicine holds for the future.

Of course, one could imagine countless such scenarios in which powerful telemedicine will eventually play a game-changing role. We are on the cusp of a huge revolution in medicine, fueled by relentless innovation like that on display at CES or in the television spot.

The fact of the matter is that telemedicine has already brought this future to our doorstep. While the ‘dreamers’ consider what capabilities advanced technology might ultimately unlock, many physicians are already working with very advanced tools to address issues that are urgent now. For AcuteCare Telemedicine, the focus remains on offering sustainable and highly effective resources to deal with the increasing prevalence of stroke and other neurological emergencies. Through means made possible by telemedicine, ACT is already hard at work shaping the future of the fight against this epidemic.

Allocating resources towards new and innovative technologies and practices is an important part of creating tomorrow’s healthcare culture equipped with the right tools to care for patients. But it is also imperative that until we achieve that goal, we concentrate on applying the amazing technology already available to us to focus on the task at hand. In solving today’s problems, we set the stage for a better understanding of where to go next.



AcuteCare Telemedicine in 2013: Cutting Edge Neurological Care, Anywhere

Following a third consecutive year of growth in 2012, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), an Atlanta-based partnership of 4 board-certified neurologists, is expanding its efforts to become the leading provider expert neurological care to rural and underserved areas throughout the Southeastern United States via cutting edge telemedicine technology.

Telemedicine, once regarded as an exciting new frontier, has now been fully realized as a part of the mainstream lexicon of medicine as we enter 2013. For a large number of hospital systems, telemedicine programs are now becoming a mandate as the nation faces a growing shortage of specialized physicians.

ACT has established itself as an innovator on the forefront of the industry, taking a unique approach to telemedicine by leveraging new technologies and techniques to enable personal neurology consultation when doctor and patient are in different locations. ACT offers a broad range of customizable services including 24/7 emergency neurological consultation and support programs for facilities seeking Joint Commission accreditation as a Primary Stroke Center, but primarily specializes in telestroke: the application of telemedicine to the treatment of the acute stroke patient. With the help of ACT’s powerful and personalized services, patients throughout the ‘Stroke Belt’ states of the Southeast have drastically improved access to the care they deserve, and medical facilities increase efficiency while reducing the costs associated with maintaining a traditional emergency neurology staff.

Whereas many hospitals with existing neurology departments simply do not have the resources to maintain around-the-clock clinician capacity, ACT has managed to successfully disrupt the trend and bring patient and physician together, regardless of geographical boundaries. Achieving this goal requires a certain level of investment in technology and trust in the people behind it. ACT is truly technology-agnostic.  This agility affords healthcare organizations with the ability to select the platform that meets budgetary and organizational parameters.

ACT provides access to the best 24X7 acute neurological care. Contact Michael Woodcock to hear how teleneurology can impact your business and patients in 2013.



AcuteCare Telemedicine Turns 3!

This October marks the third anniversary of AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT). Over the course of its first three years, ACT has grown considerably during a period of significant change in the policy and industry of healthcare in America. The 4 Board Certified partners of ACT have retained a steady focus on their mission of filling a growing need for 24/7 neurology coverage.

Telemedicine has proven to be a burgeoning facet of the healthcare industry, with technological advancements and enhanced communications allowing providers to extend their reach over geographical boundaries to patients in need while simultaneously streamlining the healthcare delivery process and reducing associated financial and environmental costs. ACT has worked hard to stay ahead of the curve, offering the most cutting-edge solutions for saving lives in cases of neurological emergency.

Entering its fourth year of providing this expert neurological consultation via telemedicine technology to rural and underserved medical facilities throughout the Southeast, ACT looks forward to continued growth. As teleneurology continues to garner attention from hospitals as a practical and effective solution to neurologist staffing needs, the outlook for the company this year and beyond is extremely positive. “The message of ACT has really started to take hold in the healthcare community, and as our efforts for finding new hospital partners ramp up, we are optimistic that we will ultimately be able to reach even more patients with and offer them the level of care they deserve,” says Dr. Lisa Johnston, Partner, ACT.

“Following our rebrand of the company in 2011, we have stayed dedicated to our values as expert practitioners and our vision as a business,” adds Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “The standard of service we have been able to provide has only climbed higher. We are truly passionate about combating morbidity and mortality rates of acute stroke, right here at home in the Stroke Belt (a region of the Southeastern US with higher-than average stroke rates) and beyond.”

Hard work and diligence is paying off for the partners of ACT. As the group continues to practice neurology full time and commit themselves to reaching more patients in 2013, they hope to add to an already impressive list of achievements and accolades throughout their short history.

 



Proximity Matters in Stroke Care

A recent study published by the CDC discusses the importance of telemedicine for improving quality of stroke initiatives at hospitals in the Southeast.   The report identified deficiencies in timely access to Joint Commission Primary Stroke Centers (JCPSCs) in the tri-state area of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, part of a region known as the ‘Stroke Belt,’ recognized by public health authorities for having an unusually high incidence of stroke and other forms of cardiovascular disease.

Researchers categorize ease of access by measuring 30 and 60 minute drive times to JCPSCs. Not surprisingly, they reported a significant disparity: only 26% of people living in rural areas lived within a 30-minute drive time to a Stroke Center compared to 70% of those in urban areas. They next compared drive-times and stroke death rates within these states. Many of the counties with the highest stroke death rates were outside the 30-minute drive-time areas.

Stroke is a medical emergency. Rapid treatment is a defining factor in achieving better patient outcomes.  Many hospitals are looking to telemedicine, an alternative strategy to expand provision of quality acute stroke care in the region, particularly to underserved populations. Telestroke networks drastically reduce the time it takes for rural citizens to gain access to neurologists who can diagnose and treat the emergency.

Patients living outside of the 60-minute travel window from JCPSCs are still at increased risk.  However, Georgia continually expands the scope of its telestroke networks in an effort to afford proper emergency care access to all citizens statewide.