AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Long Distance Learning

Along with other massive changes brought on by the increasing power and reach of the internet, the past decade has seen a drastic increase in the number of undergraduate and graduate degrees attained online. Today, more than 12,000 different “digital degrees” can be obtained from accredited U.S. universities, a figure that has grown by double digits annually for the last five years.

While the growth of the internet has enabled a plethora of such ‘distance learning’ opportunities for collegiate education, new technologies and practices in telemedicine are simultaneously reinventing the approach to professional education in hospitals and healthcare facilities around the world.

The educational aspects of telehealth programs demand the least effort and level of investment of any implementation of the discipline, but the benefits of adoption are immense, and can serve as the building blocks for increased engagement down the road.

Telemedicine actually allows hospitals to bring the education directly into the facility, offering professional training directly from the experts on the newest procedures and protocols, as well as serving as a 24/7 resource always available for consultation.  Bringing this type of program into a hospital not only helps administrators, physicians, nurses, and staff better perform their jobs and offer patients a better standard of care, but also creates champions of the telemedicine services, opening the door to a healthcare ecosystem that is far more responsive to innovation.

Introducing telemedicine to healthcare facilities through educational initiatives is also a great way to align the goals of the hospital and the provider to foster stronger relationships for the future. The facility wants to offer top quality care within the confines of a tightening budget, and the provider wants to help its client hospital save lives while reducing spending in the process to demonstrate its competitive advantage. The educational process is a great way to interface with the effective and efficient solutions that telehealth can offer. It is a major step towards a future where all hospitals have access to the resources they need to operate equally efficiently; a win for patient and provider alike.



A Shifting Attitude

Telemedicine’s role in the current healthcare environment has been blossoming over the course of the past few years, making progress towards the full realization of the field’s potential.  A certain percentage of healthcare professionals are already there; those who have seen telemedicine at work day in and day out already know that we are providing patients with excellent care, mitigating costs to the healthcare system, and saving lives. The challenge remains getting the rest of our industry and our patients up to speed.

Improving care standards and lowering health care costs are their own rewards, but also important is the evident change in the way people think about getting medical treatment. Telemedicine is significantly changing patient behavior. We have heard astonishing figures – flirting with near 100% satisfaction rates – when it comes to positive experiences for both hospital workers and patients.

Presumably, an estimated 20% of the roughly 140 million ER visits that hospitals bear each year are able to be treated virtually. That number jumps to around 70% when considering urgent care centers and primary care physicians. The aforementioned shift in attitude about how to best access care in emergencies and non-emergencies is crucial to opening the door for telemedicine to alleviate much of the burdens these unnecessary visits place on the system. Reducing the stress on physical and financial resources also means better care across the board when patients do come to the hospital.

The speed, efficiency, and improved coordination of care are all great assets for a society battling with the challenges of an inefficient traditional healthcare system. The good news is that the many advantages of telemedicine for payers, providers, and patients are truly beginning to take root with the public, and driving behavior that will lead to even better results down the road.



ACT Partner Taylor Regional Hospital Embraces Technology for Better Care Standard

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) partner Taylor Regional Hospital in Hawkinsville, GA is on the cutting edge of revolutionizing healthcare in underserved areas in rural parts of the Southeastern US.

Lacking the fiscal and logistical resources to implement the comprehensive services found at larger facilities in urban centers, Taylor Regional has openly embraced a wealth of new technologies to drastically improve the quality of care it offers patients within its surrounding communities.

Choosing ACT’s 24/7 teleneurology services was an elegant solution to a major deficiency facing the hospital. Taylor Regional has no neurologists on staff, and the nearest available specialists are located more than an hour away. Prior to the partnership with ACT, the hospital lacked the capability to effectively diagnose and treat stroke-causing clots, often having to transfer patients to a larger hospital, compromising crucial ‘door-to-needle’ time and reducing potential hospital revenues.

Through the adoption of beneficial programs such as the telemedicine services offered by ACT, the hospital has not only taken strides forward in treating patients internally, but has also enhanced communications with other facilities, connecting with other physicians for consultation and collaboration as well as streamlining transfer processes to ensure patients receive timely and expert care.

Most recently, the teleneurology services provided by ACT resulted in the administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in two separate cases of acute stroke at the facility in the month of August 2012. The two successful administrations of the clot-busting agent are a significant achievement, serving as a milestone for a teleneurology partnership that has now successfully extended this potentially-life saving service to residents of the counties surrounding Taylor Regional.

“We are very pleased with our partnership with ACT. The neurologists are extremely professional and eager for our telemedicine program to make a real difference in the care we are able to extend to our stroke patients,” commented Lynn Grant, Emergency Room and ICU Nurse Manager, Taylor Regional. “ACT is available 24/7, taking the time not just to be there for the patients, but for our physicians, nurses, and staff, answering questions and educating about the technology and techniques that are helping us save lives. Having this service is very rewarding.”

“Taylor Regional Hospital is on the cutting edge of emergency stroke care in rural Georgia. ACT has been particularly impressed with their clinical judgment, leadership and organization,” said Dr. James Kiely, Partner, ACT. “Their community is well served.”

For more information about ACT, visit www.acutecaretelemed.com.