AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Positive Patient Outcome Advances the Telemedicine Delivery Model

Recently a team of researchers from UCLA completed a major study on the use of tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, on stroke victims within 4.5 hours after the stroke occurs. That study of more than 50,000 stroke patients, as reported in a recent issue of JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association, confirms that the sooner tPA is administered, the better chance of recovery.  In response to the study, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), an Atlanta-based company that’s billed as the largest practice-based provider of teleneurology is making an aggressive push to help smaller hospitals and networks that don’t have immediate access to neurologists.

Their efforts have proven to be life saving for one Ozark, Alabama resident and recent stroke victim.  The collaboration between ACT and the Southeast Alabama Medical Center (SAMC) is having its desired effect for SAMC patients, providing once unavailable, advanced life saving treatments to stroke patients. The Stroke Care Network, established in Dothan, Ala., in collaboration with ACT, the Southeastern Alabama Medical Center Foundation and the Alabama Partnership for Telehealth provides stroke services for a 240-square-mile swath that includes southeast Alabama, southwest Georgia and the Florida Panhandle.

The collaboration was initiated when Cecilia Land, SAMC’s division director for rehabilitation services discovered an increase in the areas mortality and morbidity due to stroke. “We recognized an immediate need to establish a stroke care network, providing patients with access to 24×7 teleneurology,” said Land.  SAMC officials hope to add more “spokes” to the network, in the form of hospitals and clinics, and also want to use the network to educate communities on the importance of wellness and identifying precursors to a stroke.  Dr. Keith A. Sanders from AcuteCare Telemedicine hopes to extend ACT’s telemedicine platform to other specialties, such as telepsychology, and he expects more hospitals and health networks will buy into the system as executives see the benefits of sharing specialist services without having to house them on-site.

This most recent life-saving patient outcome from the collaboration between ACT and SAMC is proof that the new telemedicine health care model is an excellent vehicle to advancing the availability and quality of telestroke care to SAMC patients and to underserved patients all around the country.



Acutecare Telemedicine Discusses The Benefits Of Telestroke Services In Georgia At Kiwanis Club Of Northside Atlanta

Michael Woodcock, Sales Executive for AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), spoke at the Kiwanis Club of Northside Atlanta on April 13th  discussing the benefits of ACT’s teleneurology services for residents of rural Georgia who lack access to emergency neurological expertise. The presentation was delivered to the membership of the Club, a civic organization comprised of business leaders in the metro Atlanta area.

Woodcock’s presentation, sponsored by Club President Daniel Shorr and Vice-President Joel Isenberg, was entitled “Telestroke in Rural Georgia: Bridging the Gap Between Doctor and Patient”.

The presentation presented the statistics for stroke mortality in the U.S., focusing specifically on the “Stroke Belt” of the Southeast, which includes the state of Georgia.  Georgia’s mortality rates for stroke are among the highest in the nation, and providing expert stroke care to rural Georgians via telemedicine can be a key factor in reducing those mortality rates over time. Woodcock discussed the importance of promoting stroke awareness among the general public, and how crucial it is for individuals to recognize the warning signs for stroke (Face/Arms/Speech/Time).

“It is a well-known adage within the neurology community that “Time is Brain”, and that granting patients immediate access to expert care is crucial to preventing potentially severe disability or even death.” said Woodcock. “AcuteCare Telemedicine can provide that expertise to hospitals that enables them to better care for stroke patients in areas of Georgia that are traditionally underserved.”

For more information about AcuteCare Telemedicine, visit www.acutecaretelemed.com



Yes America, Time IS Brain

“Time is brain” is such a frequently repeated mantra of stroke neurologists that it seems almost to have become cliché. For more than a decade, fliers, lectures and even billboards have been admonishing us to get to the hospital immediately when we develop symptoms of stroke such as speech trouble or weakness. The longer a stroke victim goes without treatment, the more brain damage accrues and the greater the likelihood of permanent disability or death. Using the latest methods to restore flow to blocked arteries, neurologists can improve the outcomes of stroke victims beyond anything imagined before the “Decade of the Brain.” 

It was distressing to be called recently to see Sam, a 55 year old, via teleneurology consultation. Sam had fallen at home around midnight. When his wife noticed his complete paralysis on the left side, she wanted to call the EMS. However, he refused to let her do so and dragged himself to bed. When he was no better by the morning, they came to the ER more than 12 hours after the stroke started. Sam’s arrival to the hospital was far too late; the damage was complete. He was unable to even wiggle his toes or fingers on the left side, and was suffering severe left facial weakness.

Unless clot busting medicine is given or a clot is physically removed from a blocked artery within a window of just a few hours, brain cells die without exception. The struggle against time to save brain capacity is an uphill battle. Rather than facing a prospect for a good recovery and being able to walk or dance again, Sam is now likely to remain under nursing care for years to come.

Contrast Sam’s story with that of Britt, a young college student who suddenly found himself unable to move or speak while at home. His family also immediately recognized the signs of stroke, but unlike Sam, Britt was brought to the ER quickly. A study of his brain revealed the blocked artery and Britt soon underwent a procedure to open it. Within a day’s time, he was back to normal, his brain cells recovering when oxygenated blood returned after the artery was opened.

Today, Britt can look forward to decades of normal living. Sam? His fateful decision to ignore serious symptoms and go back to bed has cost him his freedom. Regardless of clichés, Time is Brain. The urgency of timely diagnosis and treatment in cases of stroke cannot be understated.